Category Archives: Dealing with Docs

Hazards of Laparoscopic Mesh Removal

Online message from Dr. Dionysios Veronkis (slightly edited for clarity) :

Vaginal mesh is placed extra peritoneally[1] (outside the body cavity and away from bowels). Although laparoscopy is touted as minimally invasive, [it is minimally invasive in] abdominal surgery. Vaginal surgery is less invasive than both laparoscopic and robotic surgery.

Robotic surgery is laparoscopic surgery aided by a computer to help the surgeon move robotic arms [which guide instruments].

When mesh is placed vaginally and removal is attempted laparoscopically, the surgeon must place small 5mm to 12mm incisions and ports in the abdomen, [adding] the risk of injury to the bowel blood vessels during trocar insertion. The peritoneum must then be cut and the bladder and vagina or rectum and vagina must be separated [by cutting through the connecting fascia].

Bear in mind that when instruments are inserted thru the abdomen, that port creates a fulcrum and a vertical angle thru the abdominal wall limits the movement of the instruments [while they operate on the horizontally-oriented] vagina.

While all this is going on you are tipped head down pelvis up so your bowels move out of harm’s way. The surgeon is operating while standing at your side with thin 5mm to 10mm instruments pushed thru your abdomen to reach your vagina—17 to 25 inches [away].

[Your alternative is to] find a vaginal surgeon who can forgo all that and go directly thru your vagina to the mesh. Remember, mesh was placed vaginally.

The thin laparoscopic instruments were never designed for the structural stiffness of the mesh. Laparoscopic instruments were designed to be thin and delicate since bowel is always present. Due to the nonspecific delicate instruments used in laparoscopic and robotic surgery, in order to remove mesh in laparoscopic surgery, robotic energy must be used. Laparoscopic surgery uses electricity to cut tissue and stop bleeding which generates heat.

Mesh is plastic. Heat melts plastic.[2] Removals done with the use of electricity will look blackened or burned with no clear edges or ends and small blood vessels need to be cauterized.

Liberal use of energy will melt the mesh, create a thermal injury that will kill tissue days later (and may result in a hole in the rectum or the bladder) or, in order to avoid melting the mesh, more tissue will be removed [than necessary], increasing the risk of a hole or a fistula.

Mesh in both groins from a TOT and mesh under the skin and muscles from a TVT can NOT be accessed by laparoscopy. They [require] an incision.

Finally, you can do all that or have the mesh removed vaginally with sharp dissection using more durable instruments designed specifically for vaginal surgery.

– D. K. Veronikis M.D. of St Louis, MO

[1] Peritoneum: the serous membrane that lines the walls of the abdominal cavity and folds inward to enclose the viscera. Normally, it is separate from the pelvic viscera.

[2] When polypropylene melts, depending on the particular material, it releases plasticizers, stabilizers, and biocides. Most of these materials will have a very low vapor pressure, so they will probably form aerosols (white smoke) and should be taken care of with a little fresh air
Burned polypropylene (black smoke, and/or flames) can form a large number of organic compounds (oxidation and/or decomposition products) including some formaldehyde, an eye and respiratory irritant, as well as related compounds.

 

 

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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UPDATE: Australian Pelvic Mesh – Carolyn Chisholm

UPDATE: Carolyn (Caz) Chisholm, of Perth Australia, started a search three years ago to find a surgeon and a hospital to sponsor a visit by Dr. Dionysios Veronikis (St. Louis, Missouri) to Australia because is skilled in the removal of pelvic mesh devices from women that no Australian surgeon can. Today, women must travel to the United States to have pelvic mesh removed in its entirety. Veronikis invented equipment to reach deep into the pelvis to retrieve mesh that no Aussie surgeons can reach. He’s removed more than 2000 meshes.

Larger prolapse meshes are very complicated and dangerous to remove, and it takes a special surgeon to remove them. Dr. Veronikis designed and patented specialized pelvic mesh removal equipment and instruments, which no other surgeon in the world has.

Recently, Caz left her leadership role in the Australian pelvic support group to devote her time and efforts to finding a surgeon and a hospital to sponsor a visit from Dr. Veronikis in the hopes that he would teach Aussie surgeons safe mesh removal techniques.

Like anti-mesh advocates across the globe, Aussie’s leaders do not like mesh or support mesh. They do not believe in partial removals and encourage full removal wherever possible to minimize the trauma to women. They want Australia to have the same removal possibilities that the U.S. does.

“This is a huge undertaking, and it involves a hell of a lot of work from numerous people including mesh-injured women themselves. Unfortunately, the RANZCOG (Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists) stand by their statement that a partial removal is an acceptable form of treatment. They refuse to get on board with full removal procedures  [even though] when pain occurs the only way is to remove all of the mesh,” wrote Chisholm.

Aussie injured women do not agree with RANZCOG’s and Professor Vancaille’s position about partial removal because “every single woman who has had this procedure ends up with more complications, [goes] back into hospital for more surgery, and often ends up with infections that don’t go away and [long-term] antibiotics.”

Aussie activists also try to help mesh injured women find pain specialists, accurate diagnoses, psychological help, and referrals to competent mesh removal surgeons—even if it means traveling half-way across the world.

Caz distinguishes between mesh used to treat prolapse and that used to treat urinary incontinence. Prolapse mesh is considered “high risk” by FDA officials but the SUI meshes are treated as the “gold standard.” There are no long-term studies proving the use of mesh is safe or efficacious. “RANZCOG states the clinical trials still need to be done for the SUI meshes; so this means that women are still guinea pigs,” wrote Chisholm.

She says women are being implanted with mesh unnecessarily and afterward, their GP’s don’t know how to treat them, and gynecologists deny care by saying their new problems are not related to mesh (duplicating the actions of doctors in the U.S. and all other countries). “These surgeons don’t want to know anything about the complications that their implants have caused women. In fact, I have read stories about surgeons being rude to the women, some shout at them, some get angry with them, simply because the woman is presenting with pain and complications. They are turning their backs on the women.

“It is diabolical what is happening. This is why we need to set up clinics Australia wide and find ethical and empathetic surgeons who want to be trained in full removal and to find the right medical professionals that really want to listen to these women, to believe them and not turn them away. It is a very specialised issue and needs to be addressed immediately,” the determined activist added.

Caz Chisholm won two awards for her advocacy work.

 

Caz Chisholm winning two awards for her advocacy work.

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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Specialized MRI and 3D Ultrasound See Mesh – CT Can’t

Too many surgeons are sending patients to have a CT (Cat Scan) and,  when the radiologist says he/she can’t see mesh, tell the patient the mesh must have disappeared or dissolved when a CT cannot identify mesh. Plastic mesh does not dissolve. Sadly too many patients have their pain disrespected or disregarded when the problem is the doctor’s. Only specialized 3D Ultrasound with the right technician and radiologist (more on this coming in another blog soon) and specialized MRI’s with the skills to see it and read it can identify mesh.
Here is a graphic, courtesy of www.scbtmr.org that you can print out an take to your doctor.

MRI to find mesh

How to see mesh with an MRI

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]

        • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at

[email protected]

      • .

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Why So Many Doctors are Bad Doctors – Pelvic Mesh Problems

To those who have been participating in surgical mesh discussions online, it comes as no surprise that the practice of medicine in 2016 has completely broken down. It is not safe to become a patient these days yet, by the very nature of living in this world of fast cars and eating unhealthy food, it is inevitable that most people will need to enter the healthcare system someday and take their chances that they professionals will do right by them.

Discussions abound about how surgical mesh was cleared for implantation inside human bodies by corrupt Food and Drug Administration officials — insiders from the pharmaceutical industry. The number of deaths that occur from medical mistakes is over 300,000, and is considered the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Many other discussion participants report cruel, dismissive, even dangerous treatment by doctors in office and hospital settings; yet most of us are unaware of two things that should be — but are not — changing the game in favor of the patient.

prison mesh welded wire copy

In 1986 Congress passed legislation that bad doctors must be reported to a national database called the National Practitioner Data Base [PD2] in order to protect the consumer (The Healthcare Quality Improvement Act). That is you. But you have no access to the database either to report bad doctors or to find out if your doctor is bad. Usually, the only way to discover you have chosen a bad doctor is to find out the hard way, by being exposed to rude, aggressive, dismissive, or harmful treatment yourself. You may get lucky and be part of an private discussion group between patients and hear about some of the bad ones and avoid trouble, even disaster, for yourself. Websites like Vitals.com, etc. submit to pressure from lawyers and doctors to remove negative feedback that would have consequences to the doctors and are not reliable if you are trying to protect yourself from harm.

Every battle has its heroes and for patients and we found two: Bob Wachter and an anonymous emergency doctor (Shadowfax) who runs a fittingly named blog, “Moving Meat.” Both of them acknowledge that today’s medicine puts the priority of the patient well below the protection of the doctor’s career and reputation. Both say the NPDB is not doing its job.

What do you think? What is your experience in today’s medical world? Do you feel safe? Protected? How is the Healthcare Improvement Act working for you?
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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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When We Need a Surgeon – Guest Post: Lars Aanning

Lars Aanning

I wrote this for the Yankton County Observer (20 April 2016):

When We Need A Surgeon

How we choose a surgeon depends on many factors, and some make more sense than others. For example, for most everyday procedures, such as removing the appendix or gallbladder, a well-trained community surgeon should be a safe bet. For more complex procedures, studies have consistently shown better results from surgeons working in hospitals where such procedures are done more often. A very talented surgeon working in a small community hospital may, in his/her own series, have even better or equivalent results, but such surgeons are the exception. Dr. Chet McVay was that exception and attracted patients from far and wide to South Dakota to have their hernias repaired. He was a meticulous surgeon who kept track of his patients and published his very successful results.

Complex operations, in general, have an increased likelihood of serious and lethal complications, whose diagnosis and successful intervention are more challenging to places that rarely do them. In fact, “failure to rescue” is new concept in healthcare that describes the ability of a hospital to “get it right” when “something goes wrong” and leads to better patient survival.

Bottom line: work closely with your physician to make sure you are referred to the right surgeon and the right place for your operation. Read up on your problem and become familiar with the medical terms. Being informed gives you a head start. Driving the distance easily trumps a life-changing disability. And, finally, ask your physician the question: “Doctor, is this the surgeon you would trust with your own health and that of your family?”


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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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Why Not Write About Hernia Mesh?

I often hear that people think that there is too much attention paid to pelvic mesh victims at the cost to the hernia victims. After all, it’s the same material that is used, just cut in a different shape and placed in a different part of the body. And, truth is, pelvic organ prolapse is very similar to a hernia —both are caused by a weakening of muscles and ligaments.

When I planned this blog, I decided to focus on one type of mesh because it is the one I know best and because I planned to go into depth with my research. I want to do another blog called the Hernia Mesh Owner’s Guide — some day.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

I hope hernia sufferers will look at the parts of this blog that apply to them because so many complications are the same: the denial by doctors, the nerve injuries, the salesmen in the operating room, the body’s foreign body reaction and the resulting autoimmune diseases, the cancer risk, the pain, loss of consortium, and the loss of ability to work. The great difficulties getting it removed are similar. Mesh shreds, twists, curls, folds, stretches, migrates, disintegrates, etc. no matter where it is placed.

In looking at why the two entities got separated in the first place, it is important to look at the history of several legal battles. Hernia mesh underwent similar legal attacks about 20 years ago. Several versions of hernia were removed, recalled, and quietly taken off the market. Many people sued and won and many lost. In the end, really, the makers won. They just changed a few elements of hernia mesh, paid for scientific studies that proved it was a great product, and went right on marketing it (the same thing is happening with transvaginal mesh).

So, when the makers found a new application for mesh, putting it into women’s most private, most valued and most delicate place, it caused NEW problems because of the anatomy of the pelvis. The lawyers, like chairs on a sinking ship, rushed to represent this new disaster and abandoned the hernia meshes — there is no longer any money in those cases.

Hernia mesh victims: please be aware that not a single victim made this separation; it was done by lawyers.

Update (February 8, 2018) Fortunately, lawyers are now beginning to take a look at hernia cases and file suils. Because I don’t know enough about them, I won’t recommend then yet, but use a good search engine for “Hernia Mesh Lawyers.” Let us know how you do.

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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It’s Not Your Fault – By DebC

Below is an excerpt from another blog, MESHMENOT, by DebC who makes a very important point, especially for women. Simply put, it is not your fault that you had mesh implanted.

It Is Not Your Fault
Are you suffering from mesh complications and feeling guilty for “allowing” mesh to be implanted in your body in the first place?
Well then, I think, that you should think again.
No one  suffering from mesh complications should be feeling guilty.  This is not the patient/victim’s fault.  They should not have known better.  Nobody that is mesh-injured should be blaming themselves regardless of what kind of mesh it was or when they had it implanted.
Many who get mesh are not even given all the facts and options upfront.  I’ve heard from many who did not even know their doctor planned to use mesh until after the fact. The sad truth is that if you walk into almost any doctor’s office today and say you pee a little when you sneeze, he (or she) will probably recommend mesh, despite two FDA warnings, FDA adverse event reports of severe complications, and over 100,000 lawsuits.
Most likely, when you visited your doctor, he downplayed your valid concerns. He may have said the mesh, or tape, or sling he used is not the same thing that’s in the news and he’s chosen a safer product. He may have said his product was your only option. Serious and debilitating mesh complications rarely are acknowledged by most members of the medical community, so those who seek a second or third opinions find no real answers.
You are not to blame. When it comes down to it, most people trust their doctors. Period. That’s what we were taught to do: listen to our doctor.We are not medical professionals and some doctors will take advantage of that, chastising us for searching for answers online and trying to diagnosing our own complications. Many doctors take offense when their skills are questioned but, fortunately, there are doctors out there who listen and sincerely engage with their patients. There are even a few doctors who remember how to make repairs without using synthetic mesh–they are worth finding.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 9
It’s human nature to kick ourselves in the ass.  Guilt comes too easily for most of us.  It may be because we like to believe we are in control of most things and feel we should be. It’s easy to feel like we should have known better, especially when we start doing more research and realize just how dangerous mesh is.  Then we wish that, somehow, we would have  known better than the doctors who recommended mesh in the first place.  But, hind-sight is 20/20 and most of us do not believe we know better than our doctors until we wind up dealing with all kinds of unnecessary mesh complications. – by DebC on MeshMeNot

 


“Even paranoids have real enemies”—Delmore Schwartz 1913-1966


 

The definition of paranoia is “an unfounded or exaggerated distrust of others.” When thousands of mesh victims gather and share stories of horrific infections, injuries, illnesses, disabilities, and even death, distrust of the maker of the product is certainly not unfounded.
If you’d like to read more on this mesh topic and many others, start at Deb C’s website here and look around while you’re there for more of her well-researched and fascinating writings.


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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Pelvic Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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25 Crucial Questions to Ask Your Mesh Removal Surgeon

1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

2. Why is the operation necessary?

3. What are my alternatives to this procedure?

4. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will the benefits last?

5. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

6. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

7. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

8. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology  Urogynecology  Gynecology √ General Surgery  Colorectal Surgery?  None Other 

9. Where will surgery be performed?

10. How long will my operation take?

11. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

12. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

13. If mesh is embedded in my bladder or urethra, do you have the skills to take it out?

14. If mesh is embedded into my obturator spaces, do you have the skills to take it out?

15. If mesh has eroded into my colon or rectum, do you have the skills to take it out?

16. If I have more than one mesh, do you have the skills to find it and take it out?

17. If mesh is close to a blood vessel, do you have the skills to remove it?

18. If mesh is close to a large nerve, do you have the skills to remove it with the least amount of damage?

 19. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

 20. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide prophylaxis to address biofilm-related infections?

21. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

22. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

23. What can I expect during recovery?

24. What are the ways will my life be different after this surgical procedure?

25. How many future surgeries should I expect?

(Click HERE for Printable Version with Fill in the Blanks.)


Mesh is not for bodies in motion

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon. Example here.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at [email protected]..

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